The Ben Nevis estate comprises 1,761 hectares (equivalent to 2,766 football pitches!) within the Ben Nevis and Glencoe National Scenic Area. The land we look after includes the summits of three Munros: Ben Nevis, Carn Mor Dearg and Aonach Beag as well as woodland, waterfall and meadow.

Nevis is a popular area attracting hundreds of thousands of visitors every year. Well over 100,000 people choose to walk to the summit of the Ben, also the UK's highest point. And around 60,000 enjoy the wild and rocky route through the Steall Gorge to the stunning Steall Ban waterfall.

What we're doing

For the past 20 years, we've worked with neighbouring  land managers in the Nevis Landscape Partnership to manage this special and popular area. This includes managing visitor impact by maintaing the upper stretch of the Ben Nevis summit path and the Steall Gorge trail, as well as regular litter picks.

Protecting and restoring habitats

We carry out regular wildlife and habitate surveys at Nevis and are working to encourage the natural expansion of native woodland including Scots pine. This includes deer control so that native trees can regenerate, as well as some planting with the local community as part of the Nevis Landscape Partnership Future Forest project.

Pine Marten in Tree - 2020 Vision

Wildlife at Nevis includes the pine marten

Wildlife at Nevis

Ben Nevis is home to golden and white tailed eagles, red deer, pine marten and water vole, as well as snow bunting, ptarmigan, and rare butterflies like the mountain ringlet and chequered skipper. There are also 75 different species of lichen, 33 of which are considered rare in the UK.

Ben Nevis 2 - Fran Lockhart

Adopt an Acre of Ben Nevis

Support our work on Ben Nevis by adopting an acre for a year as a unique gift

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The Ben from Meall Cuimhan - Alex Gillespie

The Ben from Meall Cuimhan

Visiting Ben Nevis

Over 130,000 people climb to the summit of Ben Nevis each year. It's a challenging but rewarding experience and anyone wishing to make the trip should be well prepared for changeable weather conditions.

Another option is to walk to the dramatic Steall Waterfall, Scotland's second highest falls, with waters plunging more than 100 metres. The spectacular two mile walk to the waterfall passes through rocky gorges and grassy meadows. There's also the opportunity to cross the wire bridge over River Nevis.

Please be sure to follow the Scottish Outdoor Access Code  if you are visiting.

Getting there

The nearest town is Fort William, which is accessible by train and bus from Glasgow, or by bus from Inverness. From Fort William, the Glen Nevis visitor centre is a 2-mile walk or a short bus ride.

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